Results

A primer for deep space photography


January 2018 issue News

It takes more than 100 captures to create one deep-space image, says Chris Garner, Cr.Photog., CPP, whose astrophotography unmasks the hidden colors, shapes, and mysteries of deep-space star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies not decipherable to the naked eye.Photographing these celestial targets requires multiple, precise, long captures, he explains. Garner uses an older Canon 5D Mark II paired with either a 70-200mm f/2.8 lens or an Orion 80mm refractor telescope (480mm, f/6 quivalent). This... Continue Reading >

Hearing the future: How Lisa Saad reshaped her brand and her style


October 2017 issue Profiles

Three years ago, Lisa Saad was at a personal and professional crossroads. For 28 years, the Australian commercial photographer had been going, going, going, with no break. She’d risen to a level of success in the industry that many would find enviable, but the accompanying lifestyle was no longer sustainable. Saad hadn’t had a real vacation in more than two decades. She worked project to project, constantly jumping at her clients’ requests. The pace and interminable nature of the work was... Continue Reading >

Portrait series conveys the beauty of albinism


October 2017 issue News

The soft, all-white settings in Yulia Taits’ “Porcelain Beauty” series set her portraits apart from others that address albinism. The ethereal images were captured in her living room in front of a white backdrop near a large, bright window. She purchased white props—feathers, candles, flowers, whipped cream, and more—to lend each image a fairytale look.Finding models for her portraits proved easier than expected. Israel-based Taits reached out to a Facebook follower with albinism,... Continue Reading >

Photographer documents disabled vets’ athletic prowess


October 2017 issue News

Jim Dukes knows struggle. Working as a private explosive ordinance disposal contractor and a radiological emergency response team member, he sustained five traumatic brain injuries, the last of which was so devastating he had to learn again how to walk, read, write, and talk. He was also left without vision in one eye and hearing in one ear.“The analytical side of my brain really stopped working correctly,” Dukes says, “but the creative side started to blossom.” That’s when he... Continue Reading >

Tallahassee photographer corrals funds for refugee families


September 2017 issue News

Have an idea for a personal project? “Just do it,” advises Alex Workman.© Alex WorkmanA combination of personal and world events set Workman’s recent pro bono project into motion. Early this year, Workman’s wife took a job at a church in Tallahassee, Florida. The church has 70 members who are refugees, he explains, and he and his wife began developing friendships with the families. As the year wore on, issues of immigration and refugee rights continued to move to the forefront of... Continue Reading >

Photo series highlights human trafficking in Kenya


September 2017 issue News

One way to garner support for a cause is to put a face on it. But what to do when there’s no face to feature, such as the case with human trafficking victims, who need their identities concealed?© Matilde SimasWhen fine art and documentary photographer Matilde Simas volunteered with HAART Kenya, a nonprofit that supports victims of human trafficking, she had to devise ways to capture portraits without revealing victims’ faces. Adult victims chose to pose with their hands covering... Continue Reading >

What’s women’s work? Photo series challenges stereotypes


August 2017 issue News

A colleague introduced Chris Crisman to the subject of this portrait (above), which inspired his ongoing series “Women’s Work,” images of women on the job in male-dominated fields.“With a lot of jobs, like butcher and farmer—that archetypal blue-collar job—they photograph really well,” says Crisman. “But traditionally they’re all men.” He was intrigued by this subject’s story—that she’d left a graphic design career to train to become a butcher. And he realized he’d... Continue Reading >

Symmetry in the city: A photo diary of New York edifices


August 2017 issue News

Jan. 7, 2016, fine art photographer Edi Chen committed herself to a 366 project: photographing the symmetry of New York edifices. Having recently moved to Brooklyn from Beijing, Chen was fascinated by the architecture of the city and wanted an ongoing project that would honor the beauty around her.“When I look back, I feel like it’s a diary of New York City because it records every day of life for me,” she says of the series, “Balance.” Lots of photographers commit to daily photo... Continue Reading >

A personal project redefined David Peters’ photography business


July 2017 issue Profiles

David Peters realized the true value of his work, and it changed his lifeFor decades, David Peters, M.Photog.Cr., F-ASP, ran a successful portrait business in Marin County, California, just outside of San Francisco. As he advanced into his 60s, Peters wondered if there might be a more profound purpose for him and his work, something to refocus his efforts and allow him to continue his career on renegotiated terms.Around the time he was contemplating questions that would potentially alter... Continue Reading >
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