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Ease Into Video Editing with Adobe Premiere Elements 12 Guided Edits

By Stan Sholik 

201311we_PEboxshot.jpgWith every smartphone and consumer digital camera capable of video as well as still captures, clients expect professional photographers to be able to capture video on their cameras. However, many professionals are not taking advantage of this potential profit center. It's not that the process of capturing video is the issue for photographers; that is pretty straightforward. The issue is editing the video clips once they are captured.

Video editing can certainly be challenging to learn. Adobe recognizes this and has introduced a new feature, Guided Edits, in Adobe Premiere Elements 12, to guide the user through a logical workflow and lower the slope of the video editing learning curve. Guided Edits is a well-designed and welcome new feature for Premiere Elements. After using Guided Edits for a few videos, you are prepared to advance to the Expert mode of Premiere Elements, which includes the full set of tools you need to edit and output videos for your clients.

A good starting point for video editing is shooting video clips of your family using the camera you would use to shoot video for your clients. You can use the Elements Organizer included with Premiere Elements or another program to move the clips onto your hard drive.

When you open Premiere Elements 12, you select New Project after clicking the Video Editor tab. Premiere Elements 12 opens in the Quick Edit mode. Immediately select Guided from the mode selection bar to enter the Guided Edits mode and open a dropdown list of common edits that are often needed with videos.

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Start your first video editing project by choosing Video Editor, then New Project, in the Premiere Elements 12 welcome screen. Click on Guided in the mode selection menu bar to enter the Guided Edits mode. [Click any screen grab for a large view.]

The first guided edit, Getting started with Premiere Elements, quickly walks you through an overview of a simplified edit. You will find it useful to perform the tutorial with a couple of video clips that you have imported to get a feel for the entire workflow, and then to close the tutorial without saving your work. Having seen how simple the process can be, you are ready to proceed.

The first step is to bring the video clips into Premiere Elements. Utilizing the tip from the Getting started tutorial, you click Add Media from the mode selection bar to open a dropdown panel of import options. Since the videos are already on your hard drive, you select Files and Folders, navigate to the files, select them all and click Import.

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The first video in Guided Edits guides you through the entire process. The first step is to Add Media to a project.

The clips appear in the timeline below the main preview window. Since the process of adding media returns you to the Quick mode, you may want to tap the spacebar or click the right-facing triangular Play button to see a quick playback of the clips. Don't worry if the playback isn't smooth at this point. Once you click the Render button to the right of the playback buttons the video will play back smoothly. But it isn't time for that yet. As the video clips play back, the Current Time Indicator (CTI) shows the position of the playback within each clip.

Select Guided again from the mode selection bar to return to Guided Edits mode and continue the process. The first step is to trim unwanted pieces out of the beginning, end, and middle of each clip.

Click the Trimming Unwanted Frames tutorial in the Guided Edits list to begin. The clips expand in the Timeline and an animated yellow arrow at the beginning of the first clip appears. The Guided Edits instruction window advises you to drag the CTI to the location where you want the trim. Click the scissor icon attached to the CTI to make the trim. The trimmed portion is not deleted from the clip. It is only edited out of the current project.  Click the Next button in the instruction window for information on trimming the end of the clip, and for trimming in the middle of the clip. Drag the CTI through all of the clips and trim each one as needed.

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With video clips added to the project, the next Guided Edit step gives you instructions on trimming unwanted frames from the beginnings and ends of the clips.

You can drag a clip to a new position in the timeline to rearrange the order, or click on a clip to select it and then right-click and select Delete and Close Gap to remove the clip from the project. Tap the backslash key to compress the clips to the available space in the Timeline. With this rough cut completed, it is a good time to save the project. Click Save in the mode selection bar and save the project on your hard drive.

Click Guided again to reenter the Guided Edits mode. The next step is to add transitions between the clips. Select Adding Transitions between video clips from the guided edits list. The guided edits instruction window opens and the animated yellow arrow points to the Transitions panel in the Actions bar below the preview window. Click Next in the guided edits instruction window to open the transitions panel. Select one of the nine transitions and drag it between clips. Select a duration and an alignment for the transition in the Transition Adjustments panel and click Done to save the transition. Repeat this to add transitions between each of the clips, and at the beginning and end of the project if you desire.

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Adding transitions between video clips is the next step in Guided Edits after trimming the clips.

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Premiere Elements 12 offers a variety of possible transitions between clips. Guided Edits shows you visually how to add them.

The next step in the Guided Edits list allows you to add sound (a music score or sound effects) to your video. By following the directions in the Guided Edit, you open the Audio panel in the Action bar. Premiere 12 includes seven categories of music available for download. You can click on each of the icons to preview the music. When you find the appropriate music, drag it onto the audio line in the timeline. It takes a few minutes to download and size to the project. The soundtrack adds to any ambient sound you recorded in the video clips. In the Expert mode you can remove the ambient sound if you prefer. You can also use Guided Edits to add a narration track with the option of muting the existing audio while adding the narration. You are guided through the narration process just as you are with the other Guided Edits.

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Adding a music score is another of the Guided Edits options. Premiere Elements 12 includes seven categories of music with downloadable options in each category.

Also available as a Guided Edit is the ability to adjust brightness, contrast, and color, to add a title, to create a picture-in-picture effect, and to animate graphics in your video. And when you are comfortable with the workflow shown in the Guided Edits, you are ready to move on to the video effects in the Action bar, and then to the Expert mode.

The Export mode offers a more detailed Timeline with the ability to add additional audio and video tracks. Here is where you can alt/option click on the ambient audio track to unlink it from the video portion, then right click on it and unclick the Enable checkmark to silence the ambient sound you recorded.

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In the Expert mode you can unlink and mute the ambient audio recorded so that the added music track  is heard, along with any narration you may have added using Guided Edits.

When you are satisfied with your efforts, click the Render button to put everything together into a smooth running video. Click the full screen icon and tap the spacebar to play your video. If it looks good, click Publish+Share and choose and output format appropriate for your needs. It really is that simple.

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After rendering and reviewing the video, clicking Publish+Share opens a panel of output options.

The new Quick Edit mode of Adobe Premiere Elements 12 provides the instructions that still photographers need in order to provide a comfortable transition from still to video editing. The look and feel are similar enough to Adobe Photoshop Elements and Adobe Photoshop that Premiere 12 doesn't appear completely foreign. And when you are ready to move on to professional level video editing, you will find the transition to Adobe Premiere Pro equally comfortable.

Adobe Premiere Elements 12 is available as a standalone boxed program for a street price of less than $100. Adobe provides the usual wide array of video tutorials and helpful information on Premiere Elements at adobe.com.

Stan Sholik is a commercial/advertising photographer in Santa Ana, Calif., specializing in still life and macro photography. His latest book, "Photoshop CC: Top 100 Tips and Tricks" (Wiley), is available now.

 

System Requirements

Windows

2GHz or faster processor with SSE2 support; dual-core processor required for HDV or AVCHD editing and Blu-ray or AVCHD export

Microsoft Windows XP with Service Pack 3, Windows Vista with Service Pack 2, Windows 7, or Windows 8 (Adobe Premiere Elements Editor runs in 32-bit mode on Windows XP and Windows Vista and in 64-bit or 32-bit mode on Windows 7 and Windows 8; all other applications run native on 32-bit operating systems and in 32-bit compatibility mode on 64-bit operating systems)

2GB of RAM

4GB of available hard-disk space to install applications; additional 5GB to download content

Graphics card with the latest updated drivers

Color monitor with 16-bit color video card

1024x768 display resolution

Microsoft DirectX 9 or 10 compatible sound and display driver

DVD-ROM drive (compatible DVD burner required to burn DVDs; compatible Blu-ray burner required to burn Blu-ray discs)

DV/i.LINK/FireWire/IEEE 1394 interface to connect a Digital 8 DV or HDV camcorder

QuickTime 7 software

Windows Media Player (required if importing/exporting Windows Media formats)

Internet connection required for product activation

 

Macintosh

64-bit multicore Intel processor

Mac OS X v10.6 through v10.8

2GB of RAM

4GB of available hard-disk space to install applications; additional 5GB to download content

Graphics card with the latest updated drivers
1024x768 display resolution

DVD-ROM drive (compatible DVD burner required to burn DVDs; compatible Blu-ray burner required to burn Blu-ray discs)

DV/i.LINK/FireWire/IEEE 1394 interface to connect a Digital 8 DV or HDV camcorder

QuickTime 7 software

Internet connection required for product activation