« September 2013 | Main | November 2013 »

October 2013 Archives

October 10, 2013

Excerpt: Color, Dodging, and Burning Tips from "Digital Image Editing and Special Effects"

The following is an excerpt from Michael Freeman's "Digital Image Editing and Special Effects" (Focal Press, $24.95). 

Color adjustments

There could be any number of reasons why you may feel it necessary to adjust the colors in an image. It might be that you simply want to boost the overall color of an image for a more saturated look; alternatively you may want to single out one particular color to increase or decrease saturation without affecting the rest of the colors in the image. Whatever color adjustment you want to make, you’ll get the best results using the Hue/Saturation command. This is a powerful tool that lets you make color changes quickly and easily.

When you choose your camera's user settings, it's advisable to set the color saturation control to a minimum, unless you're intending to print directly from the camera. Although this will usually result in images that lack color right out of the camera, it does mean that you can color correct the image in a much more controlled manner using image-editing software, rather than relying on your camera's processor to get it right for you.

Once the camera has embedded the color settings, it’s often difficult to change them should you want to—especially if you’re shooting JPEGs—without degrading the image. Here a Hue/Saturation command was used and the Saturation slider moved to the right to boost the overall color. A fairly strong setting was used to make the most of the warm reds of the sunset.

1: This photograph of fishing boats has attractive, nicely saturated colors, but the yellow nets in the foreground are not as vivid as they seemed at the time of shooting.

Digital-Image-Editing-and-Special-Effects---Copy_Page_060_Image_0001.jpg

2: If we increase the overall saturation of the image so that the nets are brighter, the result is distinctly oversaturated colors across the board. Not the result we want.

hsl_overall.jpg

Digital-Image-Editing-and-Special-Effects---Copy_Page_060_Image_0002.jpg

3: One of the benefits of the Hue/Saturation command is that you can select specific colors to enhance using the pull-down menu. By selecting “Yellows” we can increase the saturation of the yellow hues in the image without oversaturating the rest of the image.

hsl_yellows.jpg

Digital-Image-Editing-and-Special-Effects---Copy_Page_060_Image_0003.jpg

4: If you’re working with raw files, Lightroom offers a powerful color control panel that features three sliders—Hue, Saturation, and Luminence—for each of the key eight colors—Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Aqua, Blue, Purple, and Magenta. The sliders let you target specific color adjustments with accuracy.

lightroom_hsl_sliders.jpg

 

Fine-tuning color

Although the Hue/Saturation dialog is a powerful and relatively versatile tool, when it comes to making really specific color corrections it’s necessary to use the command in combination with other tools. In this example, we need to select and correct a very specific color without affecting any of the other colors in the photograph. This is a good example of a very localized correction that simply would not be possible to accomplish using a raw conversion program.

This striking image of a humming-bird hawkmoth in flight has captured the insect well. However, the Valerian on which it is feeding appears too red (perhaps reflected light from a red colored wall). The Hue/Saturation command on its own will not be able to isolate the color of the plant as it is a mixture of a number of subtle hues.

Digital-Image-Editing-and-Special-Effects---Copy_Page_061_Image_0001.jpg

Instead, we select the Eyedropper tool from the Toolbox and click on a particularly red part of the plant. Having sampled the color, we’ll next go to Select > Color Range. This brings up the Color Range dialog box. This shows all the elements of the picture that share the sampled color in white. Moving the Fuzziness slider to the right will widen the selection. Here we’ve set the slider so that most of the plant has been selected.

Digital-Image-Editing-and-Special-Effects---Copy_Page_061_Image_0002.jpg

color_range_select.jpg

Having set the Fuzziness slider, clicking OK will make the selection, outlined by the familiar marching ants.

Digital-Image-Editing-and-Special-Effects---Copy_Page_062_Image_0002.jpg

Now that we’ve isolated the offending color, we can use the Hue/Saturation command to change the color of the selected area. Hiding the marching ants selection by pressing Ctrl/_ + H provides us with a clear view of the plant as we’re making the adjustment.

Experimenting with various Hue settings, and reducing the saturation a little, provides us with a much more accurate color— important to keep the botanists happy! Using the Color Range command is an excellent way of selecting an area of an image for corrections other than just color.

Digital-Image-Editing-and-Special-Effects---Copy_Page_062_Image_0001.jpg

 

Dodging & burning

Dodging and burning are old darkroom terms and involve making specific areas of an image either lighter (dodging) or darker (burning). In the days of black-and-white printing, the dodging and burning process was considered a fundamental creative process in order to arrive at the final printed result. Conventionally, dodging was carried out by masking certain areas of the print so they would receive less light as the photo was being exposed, thereby making them lighter.

Other areas that received additional light during exposure became darker when the print was developed—and these areas were said to be “burned” or “burned in.” Using the digital Dodge and Burn tools has the same effect, but they are much easier to control, and you can always go back a step if you don’t like the result.

This photograph of ferns was shot in dappled sunlight, with light scattered by the canopy of the tree’s leaves. The fern shows up quite brightly against the relatively dark bark of the tree behind, but we can use the Dodge and Burn tools to emphasize the effect.

Digital-Image-Editing-and-Special-Effects---Copy_Page_063_Image_0001.jpg

With the Burn tool selected, a fairly strong exposure was set in the Tool Options bar, and the Range kept to the default Midtones. Next, with an appropriately sized brush, the Burn tool was painted over the trunk of the tree to darken it.

Digital-Image-Editing-and-Special-Effects---Copy_Page_063_Image_0002.jpg

midtones_brush.jpg

Once all the areas that needed darkening were burned in, the Burn tool was replaced by the Dodge tool. Similar values were set in the Tool Options bar, and another brush size selected, which covered just the ferns.

Digital-Image-Editing-and-Special-Effects---Copy_Page_064_Image_0001.jpg

It’s better to Dodge and Burn gradually, making several passes over the relevant areas. That way you remain in control of the adjustment. The finished result picks out the fern, making it stand out against the backdrop.

Digital-Image-Editing-and-Special-Effects---Copy_Page_064_Image_0002.jpg

TIP You’ll find you’ll get much better results using the Dodge and Burn tools with images in 16-bit mode. So don’t convert any images you’ve opened as raw files into JPEGs (or reduce them to 8-bit) if you’re intending to use these tools. Alternatively use the Adjustment brush in Lightroom or Aperture and adjust the exposure to lighten or darken selected parts of the image.

 

Michael Freeman is a veteran professional editorial photographer. While he has written 66 books on the craft of photography, Freeman has also released a total of 135 books selling more than 4 million copies. Freeman is also the author of "The Black & White Photography Field Guide" and newly released "The Photographer's Eye: A Graphic Guide" and "The Photographer's Eye Course," a book and DVD package, all published by Focal Press.

October 11, 2013

Behind the Scenes: Jaime DeMarco Workflow with Capture One Pro 7

JAIME DEMARCO, fashion and lifestyle photographer

Jaime DeMarco began his career as senior photographer for Urban Outfitters at age 22. Today as a successful fashion and lifestyle photographer, with clients such as DKNY, Free People, E! Entertainment Television, and People Magazine, Jaime is known for his ability to bring to life the unique character of each of his subjects. Like his idol Helmut Newton, he plays the role of a professional 'hired gun,' bringing with him the highest level of creativity, energy and photographic experience to every single assignment.

“What is remarkable with Capture One Pro is that people shooting today who are using the Nikon D800 or Canon EOS 5D Mark II camera can get the same software functionality as I get with a $40,000 Phase One digital back. Granted, the camera itself makes a difference—the hardware, lenses, 16-bit capture. But basically, the software will take whatever you throw at it —whether it’s raw from Leaf, Canon, whatever, no hicupping … From a workflow standpoint it’s unbelievable that it can work in all formats so seamlessly.” —Jaime DeMarco

COP7_box_300px.jpg

 

PROJECT: EMPIRE BEAUTY SCHOOLS  
EQUIPMENT: Nikon D800e, Capture One Pro 7

BACKGROUND/INTRO: Capture One Pro 7 has an exceptionally versatile workflow. It was designed originally as one of the first available ‘digital presses’ and was created for professionals and agency people who needed to capture and process as quickly as possible. I’ve been using the software for many years. Some people still don’t know that it supports more than 300 different DSLR camera models (as well as medium format).

Capture One Pro 7 now offers two different ways of working: its traditional Sessions and a new Catalog structure. I prefer to work with Sessions because I can control everything from one pane. (Though if I were a stock or wedding photographer, the catalog feature would make a lot of sense, because I’d want to use tag and search, and it would save me time doing that.)

For this workflow, I am describing how I worked with my client Empire Beauty Schools and Nick Arrojo, who joined forces for a collaborative advertising project. I chose to use a Nikon D800E tethered to Capture One Pro 7 and strobes to accomplish it. The shoot took place in a room in the Hershey Convention Center that was made into an impromptu photo studio. I dropped canvas backdrops instead of using set paper. The shoot took place there, because it was the only time both creative teams could get together during a large hair show. 

 

Step One:
Create New Session

The first step on this or any other job is to create a new session. I clicked the plus button in the Library/File pane and named the session because I split the job into 4 sessions. There were a lot of planned looks, so I wanted to make sure it was easier to find them later. I also changed the capture name to a simpler one from the same windows. Finally, I selected where I wanted the images to go.

Where I store images depends on the client and how critical the save is. Right from the initial Session setup paneI I can choose to capture images on the laptop SSD or send them through to my RAID drive, bypassing the computer’s main SSD entirely.

 

01_Image-1_Session-Dialog.jpg

Image 1_Session Dialog.jpeg

Click any image in this article for larger view.

STEP TWO:
Camera Set-up

I navigate to the camera pane, which I have customized with the tools that I use during capture.

Capture One Pro 7 allows me to set up and save multiple workspace configurations—my tabs and tools—the way I want them and then save the workspace. This is extremely useful because different shooting situations require different tools, some more and some less. I’m able to avoid having unnecessary distractions during capture, but can have all of the tools available during production.

I navigated to Window > Workspace and selected Beauty Tethered, which is my custom workspace for beauty shots. It moves the browser to the right, and then reconfigures the main categories, capture, color to include only the tools that I use for beauty shoots. My custom workspace includes the following tools under the Capture pane: exposure evaluation up top and capture naming underneath it, along with camera controls, information, and capture pilot. Under the Color pane I have base characteristics, white balance, color balance, and color editor. (I have the option to include or eliminate each tool from my workspace. If I find I need it for some reason, I can always add it again with a right-click.) 

I then look at my capture pilot and camera controls, and create a new server name. I use the basic capture version and create an ad hoc network—basically a private network originating from my MacBookPro—and I start the image server and log on my iPads.

02_Image-2_ColorCard-and-CapturePilot.jpg

Image 2_ColorCard and CapturePilot.jpeg

Next, I also check camera controls, ISO, and make sure the camera is tethered, etc.

Then I check to make sure the ICC profile is what I want it to be. I have created my own custom ICC tool that I’ve named d800e Generic. It has my basic, tweaked D800E color profile, which I created in Capture One Pro 7 using the Color Editor.

I shoot a color target, and once that’s in the camera I go to white balance gray, highlight the dropper, and pick middle gray. Then Capture One Pro 7 will set the balance and temperature of the shot.

For this job the creative director wanted me warm the images and push them a bit yellow. I simply pushed the color temp a few hundred degrees higher than the color picker gray balance detects.

STEP THREE:
Color Editor Tool

03_Image-3_ColorEditor-during-Capture.jpg

Image 3_ColorEditor during Capture.jpeg

This tool allows color editing independent of the simple gray balance; they are separate tools and do different things. The Color editing tool creates a custom profile or LUT for my cinema friends. Basically this process alters how Capture One Pro 7 interprets color information captured by the sensor. This tool lets me fine-tune that whole process and further refine the basic ICC profile correction I have custom made for my cameras.

Assuming you have a calibrated monitor, this is an essential step and probably my favorite tool in Capture One Pro 7. It provides color swatches that correspond to the color swatches on a GretagMacbeth color card. I take the basic color picker to select the color range that corresponds to the square on the color card and adjust the reds, blue, green, etc.

I do this for all of my cameras, but especially with 35mm DSLRs; these cameras just don’t have the same color accuracy as the 16-bit sensors in the medium-format cameras. With medium format, I can just go with the basic profile and the color is close to perfect. With 35mm DSLR sensors, I need to go farther than the profiles provided by the camera manufacturer to get the best result. Properly using the color tool will let you get as close as possible to accurate color and even closely match the color of different cameras used on the same set.

I then go and save it as a user preset, I could also send it out as an ICC profile if I wish.

If I change lighting or location, I can do it over again—it only takes about 5 minutes.

This whole process can also be done later as long as you capture a raw file. In fact, I always repeat it and do a final color pass before final file processing in controlled light on a calibrated monitor.

STEP FOUR:
Set up shooting parameters 

02_Image-2_ColorCard-and-CapturePilot.jpg

As you can see, I use a simplified workspace for capture without a lot of junk on screen. Tools can always be added separately (and saved later as another capture workspace). It saves me a lot of time to be able to save a customized capture space to the needs of each job. My workflow changes as the situation changes, and different tools are relevant for different jobs, but here are some of the key tools that I use:

I select my base style from the adjustments pull-down, which places all of my pre-settings on the following tools. I then just tweak the settings for the job; the whole process takes a few minutes. Capture One Pro 7 allows me to save and name multiple styles so that I save time when working with files, and I can preview and switch on the fly. I can show two options to a creative director with one click instead of having to change multiple setting while they wait.

A) EXPOSURE, CONTRAST, SATURATION I like to add a bit of contrast depending on the camera and how my S-Curve has affected the capture. For this shoot I felt it needed a bit more contrast. I then desaturated the captures a few points. I almost always push the exposure 3/10 or a bit more. I prefer to shoot dark and underexpose, then bring it up in Capture One Pro 7.

It’s a leftover habit form shooting Velvia film 1/3-stop dark and pushing it in the darkroom. With the Nikon D800 and Canon EOS 5D Mark III, the HDR slider comes in very handy; you can cheat and get back some dynamic range that would normally be lost when adding the contrast of a curve. This ability to unlock more of the dynamic range of the high-end DSLRs brings them a step closer to medium-format backs and allows me to use them on a broader range of jobs.

B) CLARITY TOOL I selected Punch mode as opposed to Neutral or Classic. I set Punch to Clarity-18 and Structure-8, which added some artificial contrast to the edges of the images for more of a medium-format look. If used properly it can do a nice job of drawing out eyes in beauty shots. 

C) CURVE I made a basic S-Curve to add some more contrast to the images. I have a base setting that I always use that I didn’t change.

STEP FIVE
The Shoot

After I shot a few test shots for lighting and composition I pulled the best test shot up on the iPad with Capture Pilot and spoke about it with the creative director to make sure it works for both clients and the rest of the creative team. Once we were sure we were all on the same page, I called for final hair, make-up, and styling touches, and I began to shoot. I shot until I felt I had a few strong final options and then gave the creative director, her team, and clients the time to make sure they have the options they need for final selection.

The first round of selections were made with Capture Pilot using the rating system to get the top choices, and they ended up with quite a few selects. Once everyone was satisfied that we had a lot of potential winners to choose from we moved on to the next look.

I use Capture Pilot, because it seems like everyone has an iPad and iPhone. I just have the clients download the Capture Pilot app from the App Store. They start the app and select the Job Name. Then the creative director and everyone else can follow the shoot in real time without crowding around the capture computer. It’s great because I don’t have to worry about a client accidently touching a setting or asking the digital tech or me to navigate and star files for them. It frees us up to do more worthwhile things. The client and creatives can select right from their device independent of what we are doing in Capture One Pro 7.

Finally, I backed up everything to a second SSD after each look is selected. I captured the D800E fils as raw NEF and then converted them all to Phase One EIPs once the day wrapped. I convert all of my captures to EIP whether shooting a Phase back or DSLR because it ensures that when the files are opened or moved to another computer, Capture One shows the images as I intended. My settings and copyright information ae saved as part of the file and it retains all of the raw file information and quality. I also know that my raw (EIP) files are not accessible to anyone with Photoshop. This helps limit the people with access to my raw files.

STEP SIX
Web Gallery Export

04_Image-7_Production-Web-Contact-Tool.jpg

Image 7_Production Web Contact Tool.jpeg

After we wrapped for the day I made a web contact sheet of the first round of selects and uploaded them to my server with a blind link from Capture One Pro 7. The client reviewed and narrowed down from the first round of selects made on set that evening. I then remade the contact sheets with their top 10 selects from each look and allowed them a few days to make final selects for processing and retouching. Using the web contact sheet has become my method for allowing clients to select images. It makes my life easy and clients love that they can see the results in the gallery as soon as it's uploaded. It takes less than 15 minutes to build a gallery and does not cost extra because it’s part of Capture One Pro 7. The web contact sheet tool automates the process, making a preview from the selects for web and letting me choose how big (and therefore how much quality is shown).

STEP SEVEN
Production and Processing

05_Image-5_ProductionCorrections.jpg

Image 5_ProductionCorrections.jpeg

After final selections are made I begin final production and processing. I work on a 10-bit 30-inch color-calibrated monitor. I go through the same steps as earlier and make sure I’m still happy with all of my color and exposure settings. I then go on to correct

A) NOISE REDUCTION I turned this off. I always turn this off when shooting at the native ISO and proper exposure and light with the Nikon D800E, Phase One IQ160, or Mamiya Aptus II.

B) LOCAL ADJUSTMENTS This is a key thing, especially for hair assignments. I can draw my mask over the hair and from there add contrast and exposure. Then, if I get moiré in the clothing, I can correct only the garment. I had seven different zones in one image.  By doing this I’m able to use raw sensor data to add or subtract light and contrast from isolated areas and control light in small areas. No other editing program allows me to edit raw data from the sensor, and it allows so much more latitude than working with a processed file.

C) LENS PROFILES I used the correction filter to add a bit of distortion to narrow the center of the faces. I know it’s the opposite of what the tool is supposed to be used for, but breaking the rules can sometimes bring excellent results.

D) COLOR EDITOR ROUND 2 I fine-tune all of my on-set adjustments in a controlled environment.

06_Image-4-_ColorScreen-Production.jpg

Image 4 _ColorScreen Production.jpeg

07_Image-8_Production-Final-Proscessing.jpgImage 8_Production Final Proscessing.jpeg

E) PROCESSING I processed the final images as .psd files (from the process pane). I used the Adobe 1998 color profile, which is more suitable for Nikon which uses it as its native color space. I processed the finals as a 16-bit file at 100% size for skin correction in Photoshop. I then embedded my copyright info; a nice feature of the processing in Capture One Pro 7 is that files can be output with copyright and camera information embedded. I then renamed the files EmpireArrojoHershey2013_ with a 2-digit counter to the location that I specified (in this case it goes to the default output for my session).

That completes my workflow with Capture One Pro 7 for this job, and I’m ready to send the files to post for skin, liquify, and fly-away hair. My process keeps color and exposure in my control and not in the hands of a retoucher. That’s something I prefer as someone who loved the darkroom.

For me, Capture One Pro 7 is invaluable; I actually could give up Photoshop at this point for all levels and color correction. I rely on the fact that Capture One Pro 7 accepts so many different cameras—I can plug and unplug them and keep shooting tethered (true plug-and-play).

# # #

An editorial note from Jaime DeMarco:

I’m a Creative Cloud member and have downloaded Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, and it’s a decent program, but not for a professional studio. I could not set up an agency shoot with Lightroom and be taken seriously, at least with my group of clients.

I don’t like Adobe’s new strategy. I don’t like that now I’m renting the software and am forced to keep paying for the ability to use it. That’s what I like about Capture One Pro 7—it’s mine for life, it’s my choice to upgrade. I don’t lose my right to use the program I’ve paid for.

I’ve experienced a few Creative Cloud issues during its monthly check to make sure I’m paying my fees. I’ve had Creative Cloud tell me that I’m not registered to use my products at log-in and had to fiddle with it to make it realize that I’m a licensed user. I don’t need another thing to fix; time is money for most of us using stuff at this level. My purchased version of CS6 opened every time once it was registered. 

October 16, 2013

X-Rite ColorMunki Smile: Color Management Couldn't Be Easier

By Stan Sholik

I imagine that many photographers, and not just entry-level and advanced amateurs, view color management with the same dread as a visit to the dentist. That’s why I love the choice of name for X-Rite’s latest monitor calibration device, the X-Rite ColorMunki Smile. Despite the dread you may feel before you begin, the latest technology makes the process simple, fast, and painless, and results in a new feeling of confidence. It may bring a smile to your face and you may even become willing to follow up on a regular schedule in the future.

cms_002.jpg

The ColorMunki Smile is X-Rite’s entry-level monitor calibration system. It consists of the mouse-shaped ColorMunki Smile colorimeter, a software CD, and a Quick Start guide in nine languages. The Smile connects to a powered USB port on your computer and the USB cable includes a counterweight that you position behind your monitor to offset the weight of the colorimeter on the screen side.

Color managing your monitor couldn’t be simpler. With the Smile not connected to your computer, you install the ColorMunki Smile software and reboot. Then you connect the Smile and launch the software. When instructed, you position the Smile in the outline displayed on screen and adjust the counterweight so that the device lies flat against the monitor. With the Smile in position, you click the Begin button and the monitor calibration runs automatically to completion. The automation includes installing the profile in its correct location on your computer and selecting it as the default monitor calibration. With the Smile, there is no need to make choices for, or even know anything about, monitor brightness levels, illuminant white point, gamma, or room brightness. You do not even need to come up with a name for your new calibration. Everything is handled automatically in the wizard interface, including the ability to automatically sense whether you are using an LCD or LED monitor.

cms_004.jpg

X-Rite ColorMunki Smile positioned on a Windows laptop ready to begin calibration. ©Stan Sholik

On a fast Windows 7 64-bit laptop, the monitor calibration took 5.5 minutes to complete. During the process I counted about 160 color patches that the software presented to the Smile device for measurement. With the calibration complete, you can view a before and after image of the final software screen. The “after” view looks decidedly more color correct than the “before” view, but I had to wonder where the “before” view comes from. Having run the monitor calibration several times in succession on the laptop, the “before” version was always off color and was certainly not from the previous Smile calibration run a few minutes before. That aside, the “after” version looked pretty good.

cms_005.jpg

Smile reading red patch, one of about 160 patches, during the 5.5 minute calibration with the progress bar shown below. ©Stan Sholik

cms_007_sm.jpg

Close-up of the business side of the Smile colorimeter. The felt patch surrounding the central sensors protects the screen and eliminates stray light from the sensors. ©Stan Sholik

 

smile006.jpg

smile007.jpg

When the monitor calibration cycle is complete, you have the option of viewing before and after versions of this image. This is the uncalibrated (before) view. It seemed to look the same no matter how many times I ran the monitor calibration, so calling it the “before” view doesn’t seem right. The calibrated (after) view shows the image with your new monitor calibration applied.

I can only give it a “pretty good” rating because I have previously calibrated the laptop with my X-Rite i1Photo Pro, and the calibration using the Photo Pro is visually dimmer and more neutral. While the Smile uses the same D65 illuminant and 2.2 gamma as default that I select for the Photo Pro, there is no monitor brightness option in the Smile software. So you must settle for the native brightness of your monitor, rather than a more appropriate but dimmer 120 candela per square meter if you expect your prints to match the brightness of your LCD monitor.

The Smile can color manage multiple monitors on a system. The Smile software automatically detects multiple monitors when you open it, and the wizard automates the color management of both. You can also install the Smile software on an unlimited number of Mac and Windows computers.

A gear icon in the toolbar at the bottom of the Smile software home screen opens a preferences screen. Here you can change the reminder to recalibrate your monitor from the default setting of weekly to other intervals or never, choose not to automatically check for updates, and set your display type to LCD or LED. The Smile can calibrate both types.

In the same toolbar you can select the help icon. A web page opens with options for help videos, FAQs, and downloads of updates and documentation. These are all helpful to users new to color management and are presented in a non-technical and easily understandable way.

With a street price of about $70 and a wizard interface, the ColorMunki Smile is designed for entry-level users who have avoided color management in the past. While it won’t help you if you need a system to ensure that your prints match your monitor, or your scanner or projector deliver accurate color, it is an easy to use system to improve the color accuracy of all of the monitors, of all types, on all of the computers systems that you own.

Stan Sholik is a commercial/advertising photographer in Santa Ana, Calif., specializing in still life and macro photography. His latest book on macro photography for Amherst Media is available this fall.

System Requirements

Macintosh
• Mac OS X 10.6, 10.7, or 10.8 (with latest upgrades installed)
• Intel Core 2 Duo CPU or better CPU
• 500MB RAM
• 500MB of available disk space
• Powered USB port
• Display resolution of 1024 x 768 pixels or higher
• User must have Administrator rights to install and uninstall the application
• Internet connection required for software update

Windows
• MicrosoftWindows XP 32-bit, Microsoft Windows Vista 32-bit or 64-bit, Microsoft Windows 7 32- or 64- bit, or Microsoft Windows 8 32- or 64-bit. All operating systems should have latest Service Pack installed
• Intel Core 2 Duo or AMD Athlon 64 X2 or better CPU
• 500MB RAM
• 500MB of available disk space
• Powered USB port
• Display resolution of 1024 x 768 pixels or higher
• User must have Administrator rights to install and uninstall the application
• Internet connection required for software update Captions

About October 2013

This page contains all entries posted to Professional Photographer Magazine Web Exclusives in October 2013. They are listed from oldest to newest.

September 2013 is the previous archive.

November 2013 is the next archive.

Many more can be found on the main index page or by looking through the archives.


 
Powered by
Movable Type 5.2.7