Organize, Share, and Collaborate with Moxtra

By Marianne Drenthe 

201307we_moxtra1_400.jpg

The world of project-based applications continues to evolve and one of the newest additions to this genre is called Moxtra. At first glance you may think “Oh look, it’s another Pinterest,” but Moxtra is capable of so much more than just being a virtual place to collect virtual things.

Moxtra is an iOS, Android, PC & Mac-based productivity application that allows interactive editing and communication between collaborators during management of any project. Its main objective is to increase productivity and enhance sharing with others. You can access Moxtra via the app on your iPad, iPhone, Android, or use the web to access your Moxtra Cloud-based binders from your desktop computer.

What You Can Do With Moxtra

Working with Moxtra begins with creating a binder for a project. You can use multiple binders to collect and organize your pages for multiple projects. The list of what and how you can potentially grab items for binder inclusion is extensive: you can grab images or videos from your iOS or Android device, PC, or Mac; you can take a photo with your mobile device to go directly into your binder; you can use the Moxtra desktop app to communicate with your computer to grab a file from your desktop or laptop; and you can even link your DropBox with your Moxtra.

201307we_moxtra2.jpg 

Once you have your binder set up you can choose to keep it private or you can share it with others: a client, an employee, a second shooter, a designer you’re working with, really the list of potential shares is endless. You can even edit the level of access a user has after you have started your collaboration. You can allow those other members to edit, to manage or simply to view your binder. When you share your binder you can choose to allow binder members to edit any page within your binder via voice, text annotation or any of the other cool tools Moxtra has available for revising your pages within your binder. 

201303we_moxtra_annotation.jpg

If someone on your team edits a page within your binder you can quickly view the details of those changes by looking at the binder’s activity stream. The binder activity stream updates any changes made to your binder in real time. The activity stream displays a clickable thumbnail of the media that has been added or edited by any of the members of your binder. Your binders can be shared via the web so any participating members of your binder do not need to have Moxtra to collaborate with you.

Of course there is also a meeting tool to allow you to instantly set up a conference right from your iPhone or iPad. This feature is beneficial for real time collaboration on a project. This is a welcome feature when coordinating project efforts in a professional setting. 

201307we_moxtra4.jpg

 

Practical Uses for Photographers 

While trialing Moxtra I was trying to think of ways in which it would be relevant to the working professional photographer. Here is my short list of uses for Moxtra:

Communication for sales of wall displays. Engage your portrait client by mocking up and sharing wall display options. The ability to add in members to your binder for collaboration purposes makes changes easy to discuss right within the binder. For example, your client could take a photo of their space, type in wall measurements, and send it to you. You can quickly import the images you took from your photo library, resize them and move them around on your client's wall photo and create an example wall gallery, sharing your ideas with your client via the binder, doing all the back and forth of planning wall displays within your binder rather than through email or phone.

201307we_moxtraIMG_0059.jpg


Cutting edge communication with tech savvy clients. High school senior photographers have a tech savvy client base and could demonstrate their work by scheduling a Moxtra slideshow demo with a potential client and a Moxtra meeting afterward to discuss. The photographer could create a quick slideshow with a few images and include voiceover (via the Voice Recorder) prompts to discuss poses or their thoughts on the image in question. It would be a great way to differentiate your studio as cutting edge while putting your images front and center.
High touch communication. You could create a binder specific to the bride and groom for planning poses for their formal images and other photography for their big day. Moxtra could take the place of back and forth email exchanges and provide a more high touch experience and cultivates your relationship with your clients.
Use of the recording feature. The record feature records both audio and what's on the screen on your iPad. Imagine assembling a dozen or so photos from a wedding ceremony in a binder, handing it to Mom and Dad in a quiet spot before the reception, and pressing the Record button. Moxtra would record their voices as they remark on the couple and the day along with the visual action of them viewing the photos. Once you stop the recording you can e-mail a link to it. Once the e-mail recipient (yourself or the client or whoever) views the link, they can download the slideshow as an mp4 file. With the right equipment you could project it at the reception. There are even more options for saving and sharing the file: save it to your device's album, text the link, post on Facebook, or YouTube. It may not be a sellable product, but it would generate a lot of emotion and buzz.

I’m impressed by the versatility that Moxtra affords the user, the potential uses for the professional photographer are only limited by the users needs and imagination. As apps sometimes do, it can chew up some memory in your iPad. If it starts to act a little buggy, a hard restart will clear up memory and it's fine. The iPad interface seems to be most versatile and practical with the ability to use pinch gestures for resizing on a comfortably sized surface.  

You can download Moxtra for your iPhone or iPad through the Apple iTunes store, or from Google Play for Android; it is free. Take a look and explore what Moxtra has to offer.

About

This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on July 11, 2013 3:15 PM.

The previous post in this blog was Tutorial: Nikon R1C1 Close-up Speedlight System.

The next post in this blog is July 2013 Issue.

Many more can be found on the main index page or by looking through the archives.


 
Powered by
Movable Type 5.2.7