When Products and Ideas Converge

By Joan Sherwood, Senior Editor

A while back Moab by Legion Paper sent me a box of their new Slickrock Metallic Silver paper, a gorgeous glossy metallic ink jet paper with instant dry time. I looked at the sleek model in their example print (below) and thought of my own collection of personal work and couldn’t think of anything that I had photographed that would be suitable for a sleek metallic print like that.

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The image Moab used for their example print, resembling nothing in
my collection of personal photography.
 

A short while after that Alien Skin Software released Exposure 5. It’s a neat piece of plug-in software that gives you easy-to-use sets of presets to apply the look of specific films to your images. The presets are organized in 25 logically named sets, like B&W Films – Vintage, B&W Films – Polaroid 55, Cinema, and Color Films – Slide.

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Photographer Peter Nguyen uses Alien Skin Exposure as part of his workflow.

I chose one of my typical farm shots that I had taken with a Nikon 1 V2 camera, which is compact but sturdy and delivers great quality, and has some excellent lens options (picture angle is 2.7X focal length). I opened it in Photoshop CS6 and accessed Exposure 5 through the filter menu, but you can also use it with Lightroom and Aperture or as a standalone application. I clicked on the black-and-white vintage set and immediately got an array of large previews, using my image, of every style in the set in the left-hand panel. You can choose whether you want to see the thumbnails in two or three columns. On the right are easy-to-use sliders controlling color, tone curve, focus, grain, IR, vignette, borders, and textures.

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The large thumbnails on the left populate quickly and make it easy to find a style that fits your image. The one selected in this example is called Wet Plate - Damaged. You have extensive control over the color, tone, and amount of effect you want to add in the right-hand panels. Image ©Joan Sherwood

Scolling through the cyanotypes, daguerreotypes, and wet plate styles, I felt a smile spread across my face. Here was a way to match my rural-subject photography with Moab’s Slickrock Metallic Silver paper and the Slickrock Metallic Pearl that preceded it.

I turned on the Epson Stylus Photo R3000 printer on my desk, downloaded and installed the free ICC profile from Moab’s site, applied the filter to one of my images, and in moments, I had a fantastic daguerreotype-style print. The Epson print had the perfect amount of warm brown tone on top of the metallic paper surface. It was interesting to look at from any angle. Ideas for print projects and treatments blazed through my head and my creative soul did a little happy dance.

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The Epson Stylus Photo R3000 makes beautiful prints, and worked perfectly
paired with Moab's free ICC profile for the Slickrock Metallic Silver paper.
I've also used it to print on canvas from the roll feeder. Excellent results.

I’m fortunate to have a job where I’m sent paper samples and offered software to try. But if you consider that most paper companies and labs will send you samples on request for little or no charge, and virtually every software maker offers a free 30- or 60-day trial, you have access to that opportunity as well. Keep your mind open to ideas and product convergences that complement your photographic style. Try it, and it might just become a new product to distinguish yourself in your market.

About

This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on June 27, 2013 10:58 AM.

The previous post in this blog was New Feature Review: Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5.

The next post in this blog is July 2013 Issue.

Many more can be found on the main index page or by looking through the archives.


 
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