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June 7, 2013

How To: Prepare Photos for Video

By Ron Dawson

Photographers often ask me what resolution setting to use when they prepare photos to be displayed along with video in a fusion presentation. 

RESOLUTION

The simplest way to think about this is to understand the pixel ratio of video relative to a photo.

Canon’s 5D Mark III is a 22.3-megapixel camera. A full-sized image from this camera is 5,784 pixels wide and 3,861 pixels tall. Now compare that to a full-sized 1080p high definition frame: 1,920 x 1,080 pixels. The photo is just over 3 times the width and height of an HD video image. If you’re shooting at 60 frames per second on this camera (in order to achieve “pure” slow motion), then the video resolution drops down to 1,280 x 720 pixels. Now that same photo is just over 4.5 times the size of the image.

Why is all of this important? Because knowing this information will help you determine the pixel size and dimension of images you plan to use in a video. I’ll get to that answer in shortly. First, we need to consider aspect ratio.

ASPECT RATIO

Aspect ratio is simply the ratio of your horizontal length to the vertical. HD video has a 16:9 aspect ratio (also written 16x9 and verbally expressed as “16 by 9”).

1,920 / 1,080 = 16 / 9 =  1.7778

Most photos have completely differentaspect ratios. For example, 4x5 and 8x10 images come out to a 0.8 ratio. The aforementioned 22.3-megapixel image has a 1.49 ratio. So, when you export an image and maintain its aspect ratio, you know from the start that when you drop it into a video, it will not fit nice and neat.

But, depending on the project, fitting nice and neat is often not necessary. So this is where we get to the nitty-gritty.

EXPORT SETTINGS

When exporting photos for video from Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, you should determine ahead of time how you plan to incorporate the photo. If it will be a static image (no movement or growth), just export it constraining the ratio to 16x9 and selecting the width to match pixel width of the video, either 1,920 or 1,280 pixels wide. This will result in the image being cropped. If you don’t want that to happen, then you must settle on having black space on either side of you image in the video.

In a Photoshop workflow, use the Crop tool's aspect ratio drop down menu to select your ratio (or create a custom one). In the fields next to it you can set a specific pixel size by entering the number followed by px. Use File > Save for Web to minimize the file size while keeping the onscreen quality high. Assign a new file name to avoid overwriting your original.  

Here’s a video I produced for Canadian wedding photographer Gabe McClintock. Gabe specifically asked that I not put any movement on his photos. As much as possible he wanted to preserve their original look, minimizing any cropping. So where the aspect ratio didn’t allow for insignificant cropping, I added a white background to match his website so that the image presentation would appear seamless with no borders. 

Making the Connection - PerspectivEye Promo Film from Ron Dawson | Dare Dreamer Media on Vimeo.

If you plan to do any movement of the photo, Ken Burns-style, then you will want a photo that is larger than your HD video so that you zoom in on it without losing quality. The question is, how much bigger. There is no single answer to this. It all depends on how much you want to “zoom” into the photo. But keep this in mind: the bigger the photo, the more taxing on your computer it will be. Try importing twenty photos 4,000 pixels or wider into a video project and start adjusting the size. Unless you have a super-fast, ultra-powerful computer, it will be sluggish.

This video I did for Yosemite photographer Shawn Reeder did include the zooming in and zooming out I traditionally do with photos. In these cases, I used photos significantly large enough to zoom in and out without losing quality.

Shawn Reeder Photography Promo from Ron Dawson | Dare Dreamer Media on Vimeo.

I will typically export JPEG images and aim for a photo size that is in the neighborhood of 2,500 pixels on the wide side. These photos come in around 880k to just under 2MB in file size. Whenever a client gives me photos for a video and I see they are all 5MB are larger, I know right away they’re going to be way too big and I’ll need to shrink them all down to a more manageable size.

I should note at this point that dots per inch (dpi) does not matter when exporting. Meaning: you don’t need to worry if your photo is 300 dpi or 72 dpi. It's a setting that's only relevant to printing. All you need to know is the horizontal and vertical width in pixels. An 8x10 image at 72 dpi is only 576 x 720 pixels. Too small for HD video. However, a 4x5 photo at 600 dpi is 2,400 x 3,000 pixels. That’s larger than HD.

That’s basically it. Know your pixel dimensions and intended use, and aim for a size that won’t be too taxing on your system.

June 11, 2013

Blogging for Photographers: Creating a Community and Dealing with Negative Comments

Jolie O’Dell's new book, "Blogging for Photographers," is a thorough guide to everything you'll need to know about beginning and succeeding in the blogging process. From early preparation that will save you loads of time to more advanced advice on how to navigate the Internet and the potential pitfalls of putting yourself in front of the public. She goes over the technical side and shows you examples of specific successful blogs to illustrate her points. Here we share a small part of her chapter on community, which also includes information on spam, blogger networking, making good impressions with introductions, moving up networking tiers, and integrating social media.   —Joan Sherwood, Senior Editor, Professional Photographer

This article was excerpted from Jolie O’Dell’s “Blogging for Photographers: Showcase Your Creativity and Build Your Audience” book, published by Focal Press last month. “Blogging for Photographers” is available in stores and online for $24.95.

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Community

One of the great parts of being a blogger is the fact that you get to interact with your audience. But when you’ve done your part by creating great content, readers get to do their part by responding to it, sharing it, and getting more involved with you, your blog, and each other.

Building a community is an exciting and sometimes exhausting endeavor, but it brings you close to your audience and creates real connections between you and your readers. And when those connections start to form, you’ll see some interesting “network effects” on your blog.

A thriving network can start to have a gravity-like effect on the surrounding areas of the internet. The stronger your community becomes, the more readers will get pulled into it. One regular reader will share a link in a tweet, another will email his friend about an insightful post you wrote. Little by little, your readership will grow; as you make connections on a personal level, your network will grow. And as your network grows, so does your personal brand, your business, and your overall ranking in the world of photo blogging.

 

Creating a community in comments

Don’t be shy—if your readers were interested enough to leave a comment, you should meet them halfway and start a dialog whenever possible.

The first, easiest, and most obvious way to start building a community is by reading and responding to the comments on your blog.

Note, I did not say by obsessively checking and pondering the deeper meaning of the comments on your blog.

This can be hinky territory for even the most self-assured photo bloggers. Your snaps and scribbles will acquire a diverse crowd of readers, and not all of them will be supportive, pleasant, or sane. That’s the gamble you take when you work in the public eye. Prepare yourself for some positivity, some neutrality, some negativity, and a healthy serving of spam, and try not to take it all too seriously.

If you’re particularly concerned about angry, unpleasant, or profanity-laced comments, your content management system (CMS) will likely give you an option for pre-screening comments before they are publicly published on your blog. If you choose to moderate all your comments this way, try to check for new comments at least once a day, more frequently if you get more than a handful of comments.

With that caveat in mind, know that the comments section on any post can be a lively salon for fascinating conversations between peers. Beginners can ask you questions; you can respond with specific tips. Old pros can offer you suggestions for new techniques to try. Avid fans can give you digital applause, and thoughtful connoisseurs can give you constructive critiques.

You don’t have to respond to every comment you get. In fact, many of your commenters’ thoughts may be along two well-worn lines: “That’s great!” and “Me too!” While these kinds of responses can certainly enliven and flesh out your comments section, they don’t really add much substance to the conversation you started when you published your blog post, and they don’t necessarily require a response from you. If you’d like to respond, you may absolutely do so, but be advised that the blogger who responds to every comment creates a cluttered conversation stream and cultivates an overly eager image.

Rather, it might be best (especially when you start getting more than one or two comments on a given post) to chime into the comments only when you have a specific thought to add, a question to address, or a point to clarify. Think of yourself as the host or hostess at a reception. Your job is to welcome people in, set the tone for the event (both of which you’ve already done in your blog post), and then facilitate a natural and pleasant conversational flow. Too much chatter on your part is as destructive to said flow as stone silence.

When you chime into a conversation in the comments section underneath a post, you can reply to a group or to a specific commenter. Just avoid confusion by being specific about whom you’re addressing, and be as clear as possible with whatever point you’re trying to make or question you’re trying to answer.

In general, your readers will be delighted to know that you’re not only an engaging writer and terrific photographer but also an active participant with your fans and friends online. You’ll probably build ongoing online relationships with at least a few folks who return frequently to read and comment; it’s the very beginning of a community and can end up being one of the strongest parts of your blog if you choose to make it so.

When responding to comments from others, be as personable as you would if you were speaking to them in real life. After all, when you take away all the code and pixels, we’re all flesh and blood, very real and distinct personalities who are quite connected through the internet. Even though we may be physically remote, we should strive to be as polite and respectful as if we were sitting next to one another in a public place.

Practicing such courtesy is easy when you’re answering a simple question or responding to a positive remark from a fan or friend. However, when a reader has a critical comment, it can be difficult to rein yourself in. The web gives us all a powerful feeling of invulnerability, and too often we take this feeling as license to insult and shame others whom we perceive as insulting us.

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DEALING WITH NEGATIVE COMMENTS

No matter how cheerful your posts are, you will invariably have to deal with some naysayers and nasties at some point.

Getting critical comments—be they constructive or otherwise—is absolutely unavoidable for any blogger. In fact, fear of such comments has held many a creative soul back from blogging. But you shouldn’t let your apprehensions about this facet of online life intimidate you or detract your enthusiasm.

In fact, your policy on and reactions to negative comments can be a huge factor in establishing the ethos of your blog’s community. How you respond to these kinds of comments will set you apart and define your character—and, if you’re blogging as a business owner, will send strong signals to your potential commenters.

Different bloggers have different approaches. The thoughtful will carefully engage detractors in an intelligent and reasonable debate. The thick-skinned will poke fun at meanies. The Pollyannas of the internet will post a thorough section on their expectations of positive commenting and will delete anything with a hint of snideness or profanity.

But every seasoned blogger will have developed their own techniques for dealing with negative comments. Here are a few helpful tips and coping mechanisms for the bad/ugly spectrum of comments, from the ugliest insults to well-meant critiques:

Don’t feed the trolls! This is Rule One of online communication. It simply means that while you will encounter “trolls,” i.e., web-dwellers who exist online for the purpose of inflicting emotional pain on others, you are under no circumstances to “feed” them, i.e., show any sign that you notice or are affected in any way by their antics. If you get a “trollish” comment, delete it, do not respond to it, and move forward immediately without paying any further mind.

Take the high road. If someone leaves a nasty comment or one that’s just critical of your work, you can always come out on top by being unflappably gracious. A simple, “I’m sorry you feel that way. Have a great day!” can quickly and successfully close the matter, allowing you to save face, still remain in control of the situation, and not be dragged into a flame war (a heated back-and-forth that sucks everyone involved into a maelstrom of negativity and hyperbole).

Sometimes, you don’t have to respond with a correction or rebuke to an obviously incorrect negative commenter. Your other readers will come to your rescue—a good sign of a healthy community.

Delete, delete, delete. You’re in charge here; this is your playground. You are in no way obliged to publish every comment you get, and you can delete anything that doesn’t fit in with the vibe you’re trying to cultivate. Free speech certainly has its place, but your blog isn’t a public or government-owned property. If detractors want to speak freely, they can darn well set up blogs of their own.

Don’t fear the banhammer. The banhammer is your privilege as a blog owner; in most CMSes, you can permanently ban any commenter who you feel is dragging down the tone of the conversation with verbal abuse, threats, or profanity (if that’s not okay on your blog).

Take a deep breath. If you get a particularly vitriolic comment that just sets your teeth on edge, walk away from your computer (or shut down your smartphone) and go blow off some steam before responding (or not responding, or just deleting the comment altogether). Some low-blow comments will go straight for your emotional jugular. In those moments, you might need a mantra; I have a few of my own! “These people don’t pay my bills” is a perspective-saving personal favorite that reminds me why I blog and reinforces the fact that a bad comment has no real-world impact on me.

Negative isn’t always nasty. Some folks will leave comments that they didn’t like your work or they didn’t understand your story or they hate the lens you’re using, and so on. Don’t let it get to you emotionally, and assume that the commenter meant well. If you start by giving them the benefit of the doubt, you can decide for yourself whether the criticism does, in fact, have any merit; but if it was made without malice, there’s no need to get upset.

Laugh! Sometimes, an overly negative commenter is so off-base that their words go from offensive to just plain bizarre, outlandish, and ludicrous. Feel free to shake your head and chuckle. One seasoned pro in the blogosphere tells me he likes to reply to these commenters with three simple words: “You fascinate me.” It’s a little wink-wink that lets other commenters know you’re in on the joke and don’t take the negativity to heart.

Just remember: Your commenters, positive and negative alike, don’t really know you. Any comments they leave are more a reflection on them than on you. Dark people leave dark comments, and we have to pity them for not having better things to do with their lives.

Finally, there might sometimes be posts that stir up strong reactions or controversies in the community. Likewise, if you do any personal blogging, you might also find yourself delving into some very tender territory. In most blogging software, you can turn comments on and off for an individual post, and on my own blogs, I will very often flip the switch into no-comment mode if I feel that I’ve said all I have to say and I don’t particularly need or want feedback from others.

This might strike some of your readers as a high-handed way of avoiding criticism, but look at all the facts: You took the time and effort to set up a blog, do all your photography, and craft a well-thought-out blog post on a perhaps sensitive subject. It’s your work, and no one is entitled to any part of it. If you don’t feel like subjecting yourself to commentary—positive or negative—you can simply close the comments section.

When I do this on my own blog, I run a brief disclaimer at the bottom of the post, where the comments section would normally be found:

“Comments are closed for this post. You are encouraged to disagree, debate, or expand the conversation on your own blog; you will be linked to via trackbacks and pingbacks.”

It’s a polite but firm way of telling your readers that while you appreciate them, this particular post is a one-way talk or speech or demonstration rather than a roundtable discussion.

It goes without saying that people act differently online than they do in real life. It takes a cool, collected head to rise above the noise sometimes—but patience and an even temper almost always pay off.

June 19, 2013

June 2013 Issue

 

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June 2013 Issue

 

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June 2013 Issue

 

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June 2013 Issue

 

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June 2013 Issue

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June 20, 2013

New Feature Review: Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5

By Stan Sholik

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Photographers struggling with the concept of Adobe Photoshop CC and the Creative Cloud will be pleased to discover that all of the important image adjustment features added to Adobe Camera Raw 8 (ACR 8) for Photoshop CC (but not ACR 8 for Photoshop CS6) are now available in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5, which remains a boxed product. Also added, in recognition of photographers’ increased use of laptops with limited storage, is the ability to create Smart Previews for any images stored in the Lightroom 5 catalog and to enhance these Smart Preview images when you’re away from your main storage devices. New improvements to the Book module offer more options for editing templates to create a custom look for your photo books.

These may seem like incidental changes, but for many portrait, wedding, and event photographers, the image adjustment changes could make Lightroom 5 a real alternative to Photoshop for anything but the most complex portrait retouching. The revised Spot Removal tool and new Radial Gradient tool may not have been created with portrait retouching in mind, but they are excellent tools for that purpose, as well as for enhancing landscape and scenic images.

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CAPTION: With the revised Spot Removal tool it is now possible to minimize non-circular issues such as wrinkles and smile lines and remove fly-away hair as well as remove blemishes, spots, and sensor dust than can be covered by a circular spot. Image ©Stan Sholik

The revised Spot Removal tool deserves a new label in the tool strip of the Develop module. You can still use it to click on and remove spots or sensor dust. If you press the T key to activate the toolbar, there is a new Visualize Spots option to make this even easier. But you can now click and drag the Spot Removal tool in Lightroom 5 to remove wrinkles, fly-away hair, or other non-circular problems in a portrait. The Opacity slider gives complete control over each correction, allowing you to remove a blemish or fly-away hair completely, or leave a smile line, but simply tone it down.

The Spot Removal tool acts similarly to Photoshop’s Content Aware setting, but seems somewhat less able to consistently find the best area to heal into the problem. This results in the need for manual repositioning of the source area while retouching portraits. But for removing fly-away hair against a portrait backdrop or a power line against the sky, it works perfectly, and is a welcome enhancement to the tool.

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CAPTION: The new Radial Filter allows you to select areas very accurately and apply a wide range of enhancements. For portraits there is a soften skin preset that sets the Clarity slider to -100, but you can move it to less softening if desired. Image ©Stan Sholik

New in the same Develop module tool strip is the Radial Filter, which Adobe also calls the Radial Gradient tool, that lies next to the Adjustment Brush. A more accurate name would be the “elliptical mask and adjustment tool.” While the same adjustment options available for the Graduated Filter are available for the Radial Filter, the adjustments are applied outside of the area you drag out with the Radial Filter rather than inside as they are with the Graduated Filter. However, the Radial Filter includes an Invert Mask checkbox so that you can apply the adjustments inside or outside the shape. There is also a feather slider. Neither of these controls is available for the Graduated Filter.

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CAPTION: With the tools in Lightroom 5 it is possible to retouch an original portrait image (left) to a final output without opening Photoshop. Image ©Stan Sholik

For portrait retouching, you can drag a Radial Filter ellipse over the subject and click on the Effect drop-down menu of presets, one of which is Soften Skin. This sets sets Clarity to -100 and adds a bit of sharpening. You can customize the sliders for the specific image. There are also presets for teeth whitening and iris enhancement as well as for burning and dodging. You can create as many Radial Filter adjustments for the image as you need, and they play nicely with one another. For example, if you create an adjustment to add a stop of exposure correction, then create another to remove a stop and the two overlap, the overlap will revert back to the sum of the two adjustments; in this case the result would be no adjustment.

The Radial Filter is a welcome addition to the Lightroom 5 toolset, as it is to ACR 8, for many uses besides portrait retouching. You can create multiple vignettes in an image to draw the eye to specific areas of a landscape image, or add highlights to areas, or eliminate moiré, or make any other adjustment.

Another addition to Lightroom 5 from ACR 8 is the Upright tool. Portrait photographers will find little use for it, but other photographers certainly will. In Lightroom 5, the Upright tool is located in the Basic tab of the Lens Corrections panel. Upright is useful whenever a photo is taken with a tilted horizon, or the camera is pointed up at a building, or the perspective is distorted. 

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CAPTION: The new Upright tool has four automatic correction options for straightening horizontal and vertical objects. The correction worked so well on this image (left) that the verticals are properly corrected, but the tool wasn’t fooled by the angled smokestack (right). I used the Spot Removal tool to remove the upper power lines to the front stack. Image ©Stan Sholik

Rather than making a set of separate adjustments, there are four Upright modes, Auto, Level, Vertical, and Full, that perform the corrections automatically. With the right circumstances, it can turn any lens into a perspective control lens, making verticals upright, making wall mirrors rectangular without your reflection, as well as correcting tilted horizons. Upright works best with strong lines in the image, and the Full mode can work so well that perspective is completely altered and large areas of the original image end up containing no image information. Other times, none of the modes work well. You need to click through the modes to find the one that you want to use, and be sure to click the Enable Lens Corrections checkbox before you use Upright. When Upright works, it’s great.

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CAPTION: The Upright tool also corrects photos shot at an angle (left) so that it appears that they were shot straight on.  Image ©Stan Sholik

The new Smart Previews function in Lightroom 5 allows you to create a set of high resolution DNG-format copies (up to 2,054 pixels on the long side) to carry on a laptop with limited storage while the full resolution files remain on external high-capacity storage at your studio. You have full use of the Lightroom 5 tools with the Smart Previews, and when you reattach your external storage, Lightroom synchronizes the laptop adjustments with the high resolution images. This worked flawlessly for me when I tested it, but I would be cautious about visually applying sharpening or noise reduction to Smart Previews and expecting the same result with the full-resolution image.

There is no shortage of lesser enhancements in Lightroom 5. Pressing the F key now gives you a true full screen view of the selected image, and the arrow keys allow you to move forward or backward through your image folder with full screen views. You can include videos with full HD output in slideshows in Lightroom 5, and balance music with a video soundtrack. In the Book module you can edit templates, add page numbers, individual captions or captions for an entire page, customize font options, and output a photo book as a JPEG. Soft proofing is enhanced with the ability to compare the original side-by-side with the soft proof. You can set up Smart Collections to gather images by size or by bit depth. GPS-aware users of the Map module can drag photos directly to a saved location, or drag the saved location to a photo. Right-clicking on the histogram in the Develop module lets you change the RGB percentage readouts to Lab numerical values. Even the Crop tool is enhanced with aspect ratio overlays and the ability to select an aspect ratio to display. And there are probably more enhancements that I have yet to discover.

Lightroom began as a program strictly for photographers, and Lightroom 5 builds strongly on that concept. It is not yet a replacement for Photoshop for some users, but with the new and enhanced tools in Lightroom 5, photographers will need to open and adjust far fewer images in Photoshop than they have in the past.

Full boxed versions of Lightroom 5 with a perpetual license have a MSRP of $149. Upgrade cost is $79. Lightroom 5 is also available as part of a subscription to the Adobe Creative Cloud.

Stan Sholik is a commercial/advertising photographer in Santa Ana, CA, specializing in still life and macro photography. His latest book, “Photoshop CC: Top 100 Tips and Tricks,” (Wiley Publishing) is available soon.

SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

Windows

Processor: Intel® Pentium 4 or AMD Athlon 64 processor
OS: Microsoft® Windows® 7 with Service Pack 1 or Windows 8
RAM: 2 GB (4GB recommended)
Hard Disk: 2 GB of available hard-disk space
Media: DVD-ROM drive
Video card: DirectX 10-capable or later
Display: 1024 x 768 monitor resolution
Internet connection required for Internet-based services

Macintosh

Processor: Multicore Intel processor with 64-bit support
OS: Mac OS X v10.7 or v10.8
RAM: 2 GB (4GB recommended)
Hard Disk: 2 GB of available hard-disk space
Media: DVD-ROM drive
Display: 1024 x 768 Monitor Resolution
Internet connection required for Internet-based services

 

June 27, 2013

When Products and Ideas Converge

By Joan Sherwood, Senior Editor

A while back Moab by Legion Paper sent me a box of their new Slickrock Metallic Silver paper, a gorgeous glossy metallic ink jet paper with instant dry time. I looked at the sleek model in their example print (below) and thought of my own collection of personal work and couldn’t think of anything that I had photographed that would be suitable for a sleek metallic print like that.

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The image Moab used for their example print, resembling nothing in
my collection of personal photography.
 

A short while after that Alien Skin Software released Exposure 5. It’s a neat piece of plug-in software that gives you easy-to-use sets of presets to apply the look of specific films to your images. The presets are organized in 25 logically named sets, like B&W Films – Vintage, B&W Films – Polaroid 55, Cinema, and Color Films – Slide.

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Photographer Peter Nguyen uses Alien Skin Exposure as part of his workflow.

I chose one of my typical farm shots that I had taken with a Nikon 1 V2 camera, which is compact but sturdy and delivers great quality, and has some excellent lens options (picture angle is 2.7X focal length). I opened it in Photoshop CS6 and accessed Exposure 5 through the filter menu, but you can also use it with Lightroom and Aperture or as a standalone application. I clicked on the black-and-white vintage set and immediately got an array of large previews, using my image, of every style in the set in the left-hand panel. You can choose whether you want to see the thumbnails in two or three columns. On the right are easy-to-use sliders controlling color, tone curve, focus, grain, IR, vignette, borders, and textures.

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The large thumbnails on the left populate quickly and make it easy to find a style that fits your image. The one selected in this example is called Wet Plate - Damaged. You have extensive control over the color, tone, and amount of effect you want to add in the right-hand panels. Image ©Joan Sherwood

Scolling through the cyanotypes, daguerreotypes, and wet plate styles, I felt a smile spread across my face. Here was a way to match my rural-subject photography with Moab’s Slickrock Metallic Silver paper and the Slickrock Metallic Pearl that preceded it.

I turned on the Epson Stylus Photo R3000 printer on my desk, downloaded and installed the free ICC profile from Moab’s site, applied the filter to one of my images, and in moments, I had a fantastic daguerreotype-style print. The Epson print had the perfect amount of warm brown tone on top of the metallic paper surface. It was interesting to look at from any angle. Ideas for print projects and treatments blazed through my head and my creative soul did a little happy dance.

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The Epson Stylus Photo R3000 makes beautiful prints, and worked perfectly
paired with Moab's free ICC profile for the Slickrock Metallic Silver paper.
I've also used it to print on canvas from the roll feeder. Excellent results.

I’m fortunate to have a job where I’m sent paper samples and offered software to try. But if you consider that most paper companies and labs will send you samples on request for little or no charge, and virtually every software maker offers a free 30- or 60-day trial, you have access to that opportunity as well. Keep your mind open to ideas and product convergences that complement your photographic style. Try it, and it might just become a new product to distinguish yourself in your market.

About June 2013

This page contains all entries posted to Professional Photographer Magazine Web Exclusives in June 2013. They are listed from oldest to newest.

May 2013 is the previous archive.

July 2013 is the next archive.

Many more can be found on the main index page or by looking through the archives.


 
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