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Introduction to New Features in Adobe Photoshop CC

By Stan Sholik

All images ©Stan Sholik

The latest version of Photoshop, Photoshop CC (Creative Cloud), is being widely discussed on the Internet, but the discussion has focused more on Adobe's new licensing model rather than on what has changed in the application. This is unfortunate because the majority of new features and improvements to previous features are of value to photographers. While the list is not extensive, it may indicate the future development of Photoshop CC: the ongoing introduction of new features and improvements, some significant to photographers and others not at all of interest, to improve the workflow and capabilities of photographers who need the program because its unique features.

Several of the new features are found in the Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) 8.0 plug-in, with an 8.1 update with additional features due out soon after the 8.0 release. ACR 8.0 introduces a new radial filter, a non-circular healing brush, and an automatic leveling and upright tool. New to Photoshop CC itself is the availability of access to Camera Raw through the filter menu. When you access ACR through Photoshop CC, you can easily use ACR with file formats other than raw formats, and apply ACR as a Smart Filter. 

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New to Photoshop CC is the ability to access Adobe Camera Raw (ACR)from the Filter menu. You can also convert the image to a Smart Image before you edit it in ACR.

 

The new Radial Filter tool is next to the Gradient tool in the toolbar. Clicking the icon opens the Radial Filter panel. Listed in the panel are the same local adjustments available for the graduated filter, along with a feather slider and the ability to apply the adjustments outside or inside the oval filter shape you draw. You can create multiple radial filters on your image, giving you the ability to draw the viewer's eye to precisely where you want, or the ability to create areas of different color temperature, clarity, sharpness and any of the other local adjustments.

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The new Radial Filter in ACR allows you to do everything from creating a simple vignette to applying any of the local adjustments in the Radial Filter panel to the area inside or outside of the shape you draw. Here I have adjusted the exposure, clarity, and sharpening of the lotus blossom.

 

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You can create multiple Radial Filter adjustments. This adjustment sits on top of the adjustment I made to the blossom and darkens, softens, and slightly desaturates the background to draw more attention to the flower.

 

The Heal option in the ACR Spot Removal tool has two new features. First, the brush is no longer a circular spot removal tool, it is now a true brush. Regardless of the shape of the object, you can drag the new healing brush over an object to completely remove it from the image. Of course you can still use Heal to remove spots and sensor dust from the image. This is made easier with the new Visualize Spots option. With Visualize Spots active, you see a high-contrast monochrome representation of your image. By adjusting the Visualize Spots slider, you can easily see round spots or irregular-shaped dust that is easily missed when viewing the color image, even when viewing at 100% magnification.

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The new Healing brush in ACR allows you to paint an area out of your image by dragging over the area as well as do spot healing.

 

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The Healing Brush tool automatically finds an area in the image to heal the selection, but you can adjust the source area manually if needed.

 

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For spot healing, the new Visualize Spots feature presents a high-contrast monochrome image that highlights dust and spots that are easily missed when looking at the color version.

 

Finally, for anyone needing to straighten a horizon, level a tilted photo, or straighten a building, the new Upright tools in the Manual tab of the ACR Lens Corrections panel makes life easy. There are four Upright options: Automatic produces a balanced perspective without fully correcting horizontal or vertical lines, and also crops the image; Level corrects for tilted horizons; Vertical makes strong vertical lines vertical; and, Full provides full level, horizontal and vertical corrections. Sliders are available for each correction to increase or dial back the effect for full manual control.

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The new Auto Upright option in the Lens Corrections panel produces a balanced perspective adjustment and crops the image without totally correcting horizontal or vertical perspective.

 

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The Level Upright option automatically corrects a tilted horizon or a badly tilted photo such as this one.

 

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The Vertical Upright option automatically corrects strong vertical lines to vertical without altering horizontal perspective.

 

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The Full Upright option automatically corrects horizontal, vertical, and leveling, which can severely distort buildings.

 

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The Full Upright option works well to correct images such as this sign that I shot from below and to the side to a flat, straight-on perspective.

 

The major new feature in Photoshop CC itself, which photographers likely didn't think possible, is the Shake Reduction filter in the Filter > Sharpen menu. Under the right conditions, it can do exactly what its name implies—eliminate or at least minimize the image blurring present if the camera vibrated or you shook during the exposure. It won't help if the blurring is caused by subject movement however.

The Shake Reduction filter opens in its own window, sets a bounding box after analyzing the image, and applies the filter automatically. There are adjustment sliders, but I have yet to be able to improve on the automatic correction, although it is easy to mess it up. There is also a Blur Direction tool in the toolbar that you can use to manually set the blur direction and length.

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The new Shake Reduction filter in Photoshop CC is useful for minimizing or eliminating camera shake and vibration. The filter analyzes the image and then applies an automatic correction. You can make manual adjustments and use the loupe to view a specific area of the image.

 

Used as a Smart Filter, you can eliminate blurring in one part of the image, then use other tools to eliminate any halos or artifacts that may appear if there is a different blur, or no blur in other parts of the image. Now it may be possible to salvage an irreplaceable photo with camera movement blurring that you have been living with or had to deliver to a client. Camera Shake Reduction won't replace vibration reduction lenses or tripods, but I have experienced blurring due to wind shaking a tripod-mounted camera as well as hand-held macro photos, and I welcome this new feature. Its mere existence seems pretty amazing to me.

Another filter in the Sharpen list, Smart Sharpen, retains its previous name, but is completely new according to Adobe. It certainly looks different with an expandable interface and a large image preview window. You can compare the new Smart Sharpen to the previous by clicking Use Legacy in the Additional Options menu. I have found the results are better with the new version, with fewer artifacts and improved ability to control sharpening in the highlights and shadows. Unfortunately, it seems slower in producing the results.

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Smart Sharpen in Photoshop CC is all new with an adjustable size dialog box containing a large image preview.

 

Another improvement in Photoshop CC is intelligent upsizing in Edit > Image Size. As with Smart Sharpen, you can enlarge the Image Size dialog box, and there is a large preview image window in which to view the result. The intelligent upsizing option is available by selecting Preserve Details (enlargement) from the Resample drop-down menu, or by leaving the default option Automatic for Resample. Automatic selects the best method for enlarging or reducing the image without your intervention. To compare the new intelligent upsizing to the previous, choose Bicubic Smoother (enlargement) from the Resample drop-down menu.

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Image Size in Photoshop CC also has a large preview image and the upscaling algorithm is rewritten to better preserve detail than the previous Bicubic algorithm, which is still available from the drop-down menu.

 

For Mac users with the latest Retina displays, Photoshop CC provides support for the application and many more plug-ins, such as Liquify, Safe for Web, Merge to HDR, JPEG2000, Vanishing Point, Adaptive Wide Angle, Lens Correction, and Filter Gallery. ACR 8.0 is not enabled for Retina displays, but ACR 8.1 is promised to be when released.

There are a host of other major features included in Photoshop CC and even more minor improvements and minor updates. Many of the major features are related to 3D, with type-handling upgrades and rounded rectangle shapes for designers. Adobe promises that it will support Photoshop CS6 for the foreseeable future and that ACR 8.0 and later versions will be compatible with CS6. However, the new ACR 8 features for Photoshop CC will definitely not be included in the CS6 versions of ACR 8.

Not included in Photoshop CC is a version of Bridge, showing that features can be removed as well as added in the future. Adobe promises to have Bridge CC available for download, including the Bridge Output module that reportedly was not included in early versions of Bridge CC.

For photographers who find the new Photoshop CC features of value, and who need 16-bit file support, layers, blending modes, and other Photoshop features gathered together into one program with which they are already familiar, then joining the Creative Cloud is their only option. Adobe has the market penetration to make this change in its licensing model. Whether this is right model for you depends on how you use Photoshop in your business.

Stan Sholik is a commercial/advertising photographer in Santa Ana, Calif., specializing in still life and macro photography. His new book, "Photoshop CC: 100 Simplified Tips and Tricks" (Wiley Publishing), will be available this summer.