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Review: Tamron 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC Telephoto Zoom Lens

By Cate Scaglione

Many world-class wedding photographers can cover most of a wedding using a 70-200mm lens. With the versatility of its focal range and the appealing compression it displays at longer working distances, it’s a champion lens in the photographers’ arsenal. As a family photographer, I took a cue from the wedding pros a few years ago and began to use the 70-200mm to transform my children’s portrait work. It offered a practical advantage to capturing little clients on the move. I simply loved the results. It’s quickly become my favorite lens for family and editorial shoots.

 

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I typically work with a Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L lens. Given the opportunity to test Tamron’s 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD zoom lens, I was naturally curious.

I first put the Tamron to the test at a wedding venue in our brutal Northeast winter. I had arrived an hour early and was doing some leisurely outdoor detail shots, so I gave it a try. It may have been the frigid temperatures, or a malfunction with the unit itself, but the shutter kept freezing in place. Frustrated, I gave up and continued on with my day. I contacted Tamron, who courteously and rapidly replaced my unit with another new lens unit.

For many photographers, that first test may have been a deal-breaker. I’m thankful I did not retire my efforts then. I brought the replacement Tamron 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC Telephoto Zoom unit with me— again a blustery winter evening at dusk—to photograph an editorial-style children’s fashion session. I was astounded by this lens, primarily by its new VC (Vibration Compensation) feature and beautiful compression.

Photographing an active child in waning light conditions, I was thrilled with the capabilities it offered. If, like me, you’re not bound to a tripod, you generally need to have a very steady hand below a shutter speed of 1/60 second. Tamron’s new and improved Vibration Compensation functionality adds an impressive solution. I was able to shoot as low as 1/15 with acceptably crisp results on low-lit portraits. Personally, I have never achieved this before in a handheld setting.

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This image was captured handheld, exposed for 1/15 second at f/11, ISO 100, to test the Tamron lens's vibration compensation. 

Moving about our old-fashioned gas station location, I observed that while some of the scenery worked as shabby-chic for my purposes, much of it did not. Lens compression was key here. The Tamron glass at 200mm produces a beautiful, creamy bokeh and maintains a deliciously sharp foreground for stunning portraits and crisp clothing detail. 

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At 200mm, the not-so-attractive background fades away
into a creamy blur while the foreground stays vividly sharp.

I also tested the Tamron 70-200mm more intimately as a portrait lens and was very happy with the results. In this charming image of a newborn baby and his older sister, exposed for 1/200 second at f/2.8, it rivals the shots I’d typically achieve with my wide-open 50mm and 85mm prime lenses. Its performance has changed my former assumptions about third-party lenses.

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With its quick and nimble Ultrasonic Silent Drive (USD), its autofocusing capability was entirely accurate. It's smaller and lighter than the competition but still a heavy lens—that is the nature of f/2.8 70-200mm category. It ships with a flower-shaped lens hood, which helps mitigate vignetting at wide focal lengths. Without a lens hood, there were no issues until some of my lower-key shots where I noticed approximately a quarter- to a half-stop of vignetting, which was easily remedied in Lightroom. (I tend to process with vignettes anyway.)

The Tamron 70-200mm is slightly shorter than the comparable Canon 70-200mm f/2.8 IS models, and it has a solid build. As with other Tamron lenses I’ve used, I prefer its rubberized focus ring, which enables smooth and effortless manual focusing. It’s important to note that the zoom ring is further from the camera body than Canon or Nikkor lenses, which I find helpful, but Canon or Nikon lens users may need some time to get accustomed to that. The lens also features four low-dispersion elements to combat chromatic aberration.

Priced at $1,499 and covered with a 6-year manufacturer warranty, this lens gives a lot of bang for the buck. The optical quality is very good for the price and can stand up to its competition in a variety of situations. The question remains if you are ready to invest in its pricier competitors – the Canon’s 70-200mm f2.8L IS II ($2,199, with a 1 year warranty) or Nikon’s AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II ($2,096 with a 5 year warranty). The Tamron stands as a solid, economical lens that won’t disappoint.