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Tiffen Dfx 3.0: Creative Control

By Cate Scaglione

As a portrait photographer specializing in fine art prints, I'm keen to try new digital processing methods. I was introduced to The Tiffen Co. 20 years ago as an art student when I was using a film camera and trying out Tiffen's lens filters. Today, I'm delighted to discover Tiffen Dfx 3.0 software, which combines the company's expertise in photo filters, gels, and photo effect accessories in one package.

Dfx 3.0 is available in four configurations: a plug-in for Lightroom and Photoshop ($199.95); for video and film ($599.95); a stand-alone software license ($169.95); and a bundled application ($309.95). I use Lightroom and Photoshop as my primary editing applications, so I tested the plug-in version.

Installation to Photoshop was simple, though I had some problems installing it for Lightroom. Tiffen's customer service promptly replied by email with a set of instructions that helped me resolve the problem. (Phone tech support is not available.)

Once you've selected an image in Lightroom, choose Edit in Dfx from the Photo menu and the Dfx interface launches. As a Photoshop plug-in, Tiffen is a selection in the Filter menu. Work with a duplicate of your original layer, and Dfx effects will be applied as a layer that can be adjusted or removed. I tested the Dfx creative capabilities using filters, special effects, and various image correction modules. The Tiffen website features excellent tutorials that quickly bring you up to speed on how to use each module, and there's an extensive user guide available as a PDF.

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The original image (above) is underexposed and needs some color and artifact corrections. I found it easier to take care of those issues in Photoshop, though with time I could learn to do it with Dfx. My final image (below) combines Dfx effects with Photoshop adjustments and creates a look that represents my signature style. ©2013 Cate Scaglione

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I found Dfx 3.0 to be most useful with Photoshop as its host application. When you launch Dfx, it opens as a plug-in with a full view along the bottom of the screen of seven categories of filters: Film Lab, HFX Diffusion, HFX Grads/Tints, Image, Lens, Light, and Special Effects. The application populates each effect with your image, creating a thumbnail preview of the effect before you select it. Once you make a selection from the general categories, you get even more available presets for that selection displayed in a large panel on the right. I could then quickly choose the functions and features to enhance my photograph.

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Here you can see the original image with the Film Lab module selected. Each of the options within Film Lab has additional presets with adjustable parameters. ©Cate Scaglione

You can apply multiple effects in stackable layers and adjust the parameters for opacity, blending, masking, and presets. Tiffen combines the best of Photoshop and Lightroom's interface in one application. When you finish making enhancements with Dfx 3.0, you can return to Photoshop, where the Dfx effects will appear on a single image layer.

The Dfx interface is simple to use and easy to learn. Advanced Photoshop users will enjoy adding solid creative innovation to their workflow with the plug-in's stackable layer combinations. The number of processing choices could easily overwhelm a novice.

To get the look of historical and alternative film processing effects, Dfx 3.0 supplies scores of accurate film and filter process effects. There are thousands of permutations available of filters, special effects, and film. Software programs such as onOne Perfect Effects have similar capabilities and effects, although for historical processing, Tiffen may have an advantage.

To test Tiffen's creative functionality, I selected a slightly underexposed image in need of color and artifact correction. While Dfx enables you to fully adjust images and remove unwanted details, I find Photoshop and Lightroom are easier and more accurate for color correction and fine-tuning. In time, I believe I could adapt Dfx as my sole means of image correction. However, the true beauty of Dfx 3.0 is its filter, film, and photo effects capabilities.

I made some minor corrective adjustments in Photoshop, then opened Dfx to begin my new creative recipe. Using a combination of Ambient Light, Special Effect module halos, warm color filters, and texture combinations, I was able to enhance the image to my liking, then save the processing layers as a favorite, much like setting a user preset in Lightroom or creating an Action in Photoshop.

I particularly love Tiffen's diffusion, special effects, and light modules, which enabled me to recreate a dreamy, surreal look, despite the hard light and deep shade conditions I faced when photographing the image.

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The Rays effect in the Light Module allows you to set parameters for the rays’ length and threshold, color and brightness, shimmer, and opacity. ©2013 Cate Scaglione

The Dfx lens module is interesting. It allows you to modify the photograph through a series of lens correction tools (chromatic aberration, wide angle lens distortion, and depth of field adjustments, for example).

Once I finished building my Dfx layers, I clicked the Done button, and the plug-in returned me to Photoshop, where I continued to build a fine-art recipe with my own proprietary elements that contribute to my signature look. With final tonal, texture, and painted layers in Photoshop, I was able to complete a fine-art execution in less than an hour. This process done in Photoshop or Lightroom would take exponentially longer.

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Here you see the image with multiple effects stacked in layers. Each layer is still fully editable. ©2013 Cate Scaglione

I am fond of onOne Perfect Effects software ($99) for its ease and versatility of editing module choices. It's a solid choice for the novice user. For a more advanced or sophisticated editor accustomed to film processing techniques, Tiffen's Dfx 3.0 Plug-In offers extraordinary authenticity for film-like replication, traditional camera effects, and wonderful efficiency when paired with Photoshop or Lightroom.

Cate Scaglione is a freelance writer and fine art portrait photographer based in N.Y./N.J. She specializes in family lifestyle, women's beauty and commercial photography. Cate is also a brand consultant to artists and creative businesses across the country.